Baby Fawn Information

White-tailed Deer fawns are born April through July, with the majority of fawns born in June. Most first-year does will have one fawn each year, but twins or triplets are typically seen thereafter.

Until they are strong enough to keep up with their mothers, deer fawns are left alone while their mothers go off to feed. Mother deer will stay away from the fawns to avoid leading predators to their young. Does return at dawn and dusk to feed and/or move their young.

Fawns are typically left in an area with tall grass or bushes, but sometimes they are left in more open areas, including backyards. Older deer fawn may wander short distances.

Well-meaning humans often assume that because a fawn is alone it must be an orphan, leading to numerous fawn “kidnappings” each year.

A fawn has the BEST chance of survival when cared for by its mother. Typically, the best option is to leave the fawn alone!

If you find a deer fawn that you think needs help, use the following chart to guide your choice of intervention.

Interested in reading more? Click the button below to be taken to a page with full, detailed instructions on whether or not the fawn you’re watching has been orphaned and if it should be taken to the nearest permitted wildlife rehabilitation center!

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